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Vermont Health Department say Ned Kirsch’s death “is not believed to be related to a public health concern.”

Vermont Health Department say Ned Kirsch's death "is not believed to be related to a public health concern."

Vermont Health Department say Ned Kirsch’s death “is not believed to be related to a public health concern.”

Martin County, Fl (Treasurecoast.com)- According to Vermont Health Department spokesman Ben Truman, Ned Kirsch’s death “is not believed to be related to a public health concern.”

Health officials now say the death of a Vermont man  is not related to the disease outbreak.

Ned Kirsch is the brother of Jeff Kirsch. Jeff, who along with his wife, Nancy, passed away in Palm City earlier this month from complications of hepatitis A. Ned Kirsch came to Martin County shortly after his brothers death, but died suddenly after returning to Vermont.

Officials say that while the medical examiner’s report into his death is not wrapped up yet, they do not believe it’s connected to the Hepatitis A outbreak.

The Florida Department of Health is now working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine how the outbreak in Martin County started. There have been 19 confirmed cases of hepatitis A in Martin County and three deaths this year.

Practicing good hand hygiene – including thoroughly washing hands after using the bathroom, changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food – plays an important role in preventing the spread of hepatitis A.

Not everyone with hepatitis A infection has symptoms. If symptoms develop, they usually appear two to six weeks after infection and can include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, joint pain, severe stomach pains and diarrhea, and jaundice. Symptoms are more likely to occur in older children and adults. They usually last less than two months, although some people can be ill for as long as six months. You can spread hepatitis A without having symptoms.

Anyone with concerns about symptoms or possible exposure should contact their health care provider.

Florida residents that have additional questions or concerns about hepatitis A can

email the Department of Health at hepa@flhealth.gov or call 1-844-CALL-DOH (844- 225-5364) during normal business hours.

For more information about hepatitis A, visit floridahealth.gov/hepa.

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