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Officials ask people not to deliver supplies to Bahamas on their own

Officials ask people not to deliver supplies to Bahamas on their own

Officials are asking people with boats and planes not to try and deliver supplies to the Bahamas on their own. They don’t want to see people head over in an effort to help, only to become a victim in need of rescue themselves. The Coast Guard put together a checklist for anyone thinking of making the run over. Have you made the trip to the Bahamas before? Is your boat seaworthy for high seas and possible storms? Do you have sufficient fuel to return? Do you have a float plan? Do you have lifesaving equipment on board? And do you have a contact in the Bahamas with a working phone who can meet you? If you cannot answer those questions and others with absolute certainty, then consider donating your supplies to one of the several groups making trips over to the Bahamas.

The St Lucie County Sheriff’s Office has partnered with Missionary Flights International to get supplies over to the islands.

St Lucie County Sheriff’s Office has partnered with Missionary Flights International to get supplies over to the islands.

St Lucie County Sheriff’s Office has partnered with Missionary Flights International to get supplies over to the islands.

A relief group in Stuart is finding a way to clear the Bahamian customs red tape before reaching the islands. For days they’ve been loading a Black Hawk helicopter with supplies at the Stuart Jet Center bound for some of the hardest hit areas in the Bahamas. However, some of those flights were grounded by Bahamian customs. But on Monday the group found a better way around the customs red tape. Two Bahamian customs officials are now clearing supplies and helicopter flights at the hangars in Stuart before they even take off. This is allowing the group’s pilot to get the chopper where it’s going without having to stop at any entry ports in the Bahamas.

Thirty-one dogs from Nassau arrived by airplane in Fort Pierce Monday. The stray dogs were brought to make room in Bahamian shelters for animals left homeless by Hurricane Dorian.

According to officials, the dogs arrived with health certificates. They will head to North Florida under the care of the Nassau Humane Society. They will be quarantined at first for safety reasons and then offered for adoption.

Medical professionals are in high demand. Pictures posted to the Martin County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page show the effort being made by medical professionals and Martin County Fire Rescue to aid victims of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas. The pictures show some people being comforted, others receiving treatment and the damage the storm did to parts of the island chain. Dr. Craig Vogel is a cardiologist with the Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. He and his team spent their weekend offering help to those on the island

 

 

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